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Obituaries - Mary GRIFFITH

probably Macomb Daily Journal
IN MEMORIAM
Note: The following tribute is written of the late Mary Isabel Griffith, nee Hainline, who was the daughter of one of the early pioneers of the Spring Creek settlement.
    She was one of a family of eleven, the fifth in the line of the descent. Born Dec. 10, 1845, dying at 6245 Delong Pre Ave., Hollywood, Calif., May 1st, 1936, at the advanced age of 90 years and 5 months. Her early life was spent in the log cabin of her birth, where she endured the hardships that built up a physical constitution which enabled her to live to the advanced age of over 90 years. Her primary education was in the log school house near the spring that bubbled near the spreading beech. The more advanced education consisted of a year at the Blandinsville Seminary, then instruction under Daniel Branch and wife at Macomb's first Normal school. For a number of years she was one of McDonough county's school misses.
    In September, 1867, she was married to Captain B. A. Griffith, a soldier of Civil war; moved to Blandinsville for two years, then to a farm near Sciota, where three daughters were born; Edna, Effie and Ethel; from there to Sciota where her husband died suddenly of a apoplectic stroke. From there with her daughter to Austin, a suburb of Chicago, where she became a parishioner as well as an acquaintance of the celebrated Divine Frank Gunsaulace. A few years there, then to a homestead in the Snake River valley near Boise, Idaho, and from there with the two daughters, Edna and Ethel, to Hollywood, Calif., the home of the moving picture kingdom, as well as the tabernacle of California's monumental fraud and mountebank, Sister Aimee Semple McPherson. She has made twelve journeys across the western continent, visiting all the show places along the way. A few, to-wit: Glacier and Yellowstone parks, the Grand Canyon, the Monte Carlo of Mexico, and the Golden Gate, and many other places of note. Quite a globe-trotter with a mind full of experiences and a gift of words which made her a splendid entertainer.
    She leaves only two of the original brothers and sisters: Mrs. W. J. Sticklin and Quincy Hainline, both of Macomb.
    So, Sister Belle, your last visit has been made, the last kindness has been rendered, work all done and the tired hands folded and the mortality is laid close beside the loved one 'neath the trees, where the wild flowers bloom, where the last songs of earth will be chanted by your side in the tomb. So., Sister Belle, goodbye and farewell. Bro. Quince.

Contributed by Kathy Lathrop