McDonough ILGenWeb ILGenWeb

11907 HISTORY
Andrew Dark

DARK, Andrew Jackson, who is successfully engaged in farming in Chalmers Township, McDonough County, was born in the same county September 22, 1850, a son of Samuel L. and Christiana (Waymack) Dark, the father a native of Middle Tennessee and the mother of Virginia. Grandfather Samuel Dark and Grandfather Buckner Waymack were natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Virginia. Samuel L. Dark came to Schuyler County, Ill., in 1832. He was a Baptist minister and preached the first sermon delivered in Schuyler County. He died December 19, 1899, at the age of ninety-three years. Andrew J. Dark is the fifth of ten children resulting from his father's second marriage. In infancy he was brought by his parents to Schuyler County, Ill., and remained with them until he was thirty-two years old, attending the common schools in his boyhood. Then he went to Nebraska, where he spent some time working on a farm. Returning to McDonough County, he continued to do farm work, living, however, in Macomb, where he owns property. He spent four years farming in Emmet Township, and then moved to Chalmers Township, where he has since been engaged in farming.

Mr. Dark was married June 7, 1877, to Mary A. Andrews, who came to Schuyler County while an infant, and in her girlhood was educated in its public schools. Their union was the source of five children, namely: Lillian, Charlotte, Scott (deceased), Ursula and Christiana. Politically, the subject of this sketch espouses the cause of the Democratic party. In Schuyler County he held the offices of Constable and Road Commissioner, in Emmet Township has served as Collector, as also in Chalmers Township, and was elected Supervisor of the latter township in the spring of 1905. In the discharge of these public trusts he rendered efficient and faithful service and left a creditable record. Fraternally, Mr. Dark is affiliated with the M. W. A.


Source: The Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of McDonough County, compiled by Dr. Newton Bateman, and Paul Shelby, 1907.