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11907 HISTORY
Isaac Boyd

The career of Isaac N. Boyd, Cashier of the Bank of Colchester, is characterized by rare devotion to high purposes, and more especially to those civic enterprises which tend to the enlightenment of a community of which he is a product and development. In his makeup are the best qualities of an Irish-Scotch ancestry. His great-grandfather, born in Ireland in 1731, blazed a new path for subsequent bearers of the name by immigrating to America before the Revolutionary War, and his son, William Boyd Sr., the next in line of succession, took up his abode in Northampton County, PA., where the second William Boyd Jr., father of Isaac N., was born, leaving there at the age of eight years and emigrating to Highland County, Ohio, where he lived until coming to Illinois. In 1853, William Jr., married Martha C. Vest, a native of Tennessee and granddaughter of a Scottish voyageur who early claimed the protection of the Stars and Stripes. In 1839 William Boyd came to Illinois and eventually located in Colchester, where his son, Isaac N., was born October 24 1860. In his youth, Isaac N. Boyd felt the pressure of necessity, and recognized the utter impossibility of rising from his narrow groove save through his unaided efforts. He was of studious habits, and, appreciating the value of mental training as a general business asset, succeeded in gaining an education in the Colchester public schools, finishing at the Branch Normal School of Macomb. During the following four years his knowledge was turned to good account as a teacher in McDonough and Hancock Counties, Ill., and he then turned his attention to learning the barber's trade, which he followed for about twenty years. He invested his humble and useful calling with thoroughness and honesty, and while establishing a credit which was to be of immense benefit to him later on, aspired to a yet broader life and took an important part in general town affairs. Stanchly (sic) on the side of the Democracy, Mr. Boyd has supported this political platform for the past quarter of a century, or since casting his first presidential vote. He was an Alderman of Colchester several years, Police Magistrate four years, and was defeated for Supervisor in 1902. He was elected Mayor of Colchester in April, 1905, and is now filling this office in a town having a Republican majority of one hundred and twenty. Ever since its organization in 1895, he has been a member of the Board of Education of Colchester, has been Secretary of the Board for the past ten years, and in the history of that organization has never missed a meeting. Mr. Boyd is a believer in social diversions, and is emphatic in his support of fraternal organizations, being a member of the Colchester Lodge No. 469, A. F. & A. M.; the Colchester Chapter No. 121; the Eastern Star, of which his wife is also a member; Good Will Lodge No. 91, K. of P., of which he is Deputy Grand Chancellor; and the Court of Honor.

In 1902, Mr. Boyd stepped into his present position as Cashier of the Bank of Colchester. He represents a number of reliable insurance companies, and is Secretary of the Colchester Building and Loan Association. There are few enterprises of importance in the town to which he has not lent material or moral support, and his business sagacity and forethought are regarded as a valuable municipal possession. He is a member and Trustee of the Universalist Church, and a teacher in the Sunday school. The wife of Mr. Boyd, whose maiden name was Mary Wagstaff, is a native of the vicinity of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are the parents of four children: Charles Wayne, Bonnie B., Nellie and Tona. As one of the foremost men of the community, Mr. Boyd has led an active and well directed life, has drawn around him friends who admire his character and depend upon his judgment, and has laid the foundation for many years of future prominence and usefulness.


Source: The Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and History of McDonough County, compiled by Dr. Newton Bateman, and Paul Shelby, 1907. Submitted by Joanne Scobee Morgan <[email protected]>