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11885 HISTORY
Chapter 28 - Scotland Township

This township is bounded on the north by Macomb, on the east by New Salem, on the south by Industry and on the west by Chalmers. It embraces all of congressional township 5 north, 2 west, and is one of the banner townships of the county.

Camp creek intersects the southern portion coming in at the line between sections 24 and 25, then running in a southwesterly direction through sections 25, 26, 27, 34, 22 and 32, and passing into Industry from the southwest quarter of the latter section. Troublesome creek has its headwaters in section 1, and the adjoining section in New Salem township, and, gradually growing in volume, passes with a southwestward trend through sections 1, 2, 4, 10, 9, 16, 17 and 18, passing out of the township on the west, at the line between sections 18 and 19. These streams, together with the rivulets of greater or less size, which are tributary to them, furnish the best watering facilities to the farmer and stock-raiser. The land not immediately adjoining the creeks is mostly level, and as it is nearly all in the hands of men who develop its resources to its fullest capacity, it stands second to no township in the county, in point of agricultural wealth. The citizens are, for the most part, either of Scotch birth, or descendants of that hardy people, and have a natural pride in the advancement of everything calculated to add to the improvement and comfort of their homes. Fine country houses and barns dot the plain, and many artificial groves relieve the monotony of growing field and grassy pasture. In July, 1869, a vote was taken on the question of donating $20,000 to the old Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis railroad. This proposition was carried; but in September following another election was held, to vote on the question of adding $15,000 to the original grant. This, however, was defeated, and the bonds for the original $20,000 were afterwards destroyed, and the donation never consummated.

EARLY SETTLEMENT

William Osborn came to this township in the spring of 1828, and camped all summer on what is now the farm of Theophilus Walker, on the banks of Camp creek. This stream took its name from the circumstances of his camping there.

William Henderson, a trapper and hunter, was one of the first who lived in Scotland township. He never made a permanent settlement, but lived in various places, sometimes in a rude cabin of his own, but often in one he appropriated. He died in the county, but not in this township. He is remembered as a very tall man, and a great story teller, his talk principally relating to himself and his doings.

The first permanent settlement in Scotland township was made by Joshua Reno and family, in the spring of 1831. They settled in the southern portion of the township, on Camp creek, and near the old Camp creek Presbyterian church. He afterwards sold the farm upon which he settled, to Charles Hays.

The next settlers were Roland Lee and family. John Lee, a son of Roland, also came about the same time with his family. Alexander and James Lee, also sons of Roland, came with John. They were single men, but soon after married and settled down there. Cyrus Walker afterward purchased the land where the Lees settled.

About the same time came Austen Coker, Berry Stockton, Elhannan Lane, Benjamin Rice and Stephen Harp and family.

A man named Huddleston, settled on section 34, in 1831 with his family. He was not regarded as a permanent settler, and was a squatter on the land he occupied. He went away about 1834.

Berry Stockton came to this county in 1832, and located on the northeast quarter of section 33, where he cleared 20 acres of land, and built a cabin. He went to Texas in the fall of 1836.

Joseph McCroskey came to Scotland township from Kentucky, in 1832. He afterward was a resident of Industry township, and later removed to the city of Macomb, where he subsequently died.

Dr. Charles Hays settled on the southeast quarter of section 34, in 1833. He was the first doctor in that portion of the county.

Cyrus Walker, at the same time, made a settlement, purchasing the place partially improved by the Lees, as mentioned before.

Both of these gentlemen have occupied prominent positions in the county, and are noticed under the proper head.

Alexander Lee, who may be said to have been of the squatter class, came to Scotland township, in 1831. He erected his cabin on section 27. That place was bought by John Clark, in 1835.

John Walker, who was a cousin of Cyrus, came to the county in the spring of 1834, and located in Scotland township, on the verge of Industry. He resided at that place one year, when he removed into Industry township, where he died. He was a native of Virginia.

Hugh McAlary came to Scotland township, from Sangamon county, in the spring of 1834. He had spent the winter in the county named, but was originally from Indiana. He took up his location on section 28, and there resided until his death, which occurred in December, 1859. He was of Irish decent.

James E. D. Hammer came to this county, from Kentucky, in 1834, and located on section 24. In 1845, he removed to New Salem township, where he now resides.

In the spring of 1835, Joseph Sullivan, Sr., who settled in Industry township, a year previous, came to Scotland, and engaged in farming, about three miles south of the present city of Macomb. He remained here until his death, which occurred April 7, 1854. Mr. Sullivan was born in Virginia, March 2, 1787, and was a son of Jeremiah Sullivan, also a native of that state. When Joseph was 15 years of age, he went with his parents to Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he remained until he came to this county. He was married in Pennsylvania, to Martha Lutton, a native of Maryland. She died in this township, December 25, 1849.

Allen H. Walker came in 1835, settling on the northeast quarter of section 35, where he afterward died. His son, Theophilus G., now resides upon the old homestead.

Theophilus G. Walker, a prominent citizen of this county, is a son of Allen H. Walker, a native of Adair county, Kentucky. The latter came to McDonough county in 1835, and lived for one year, upon Cyrus Walker's farm. In the spring of 1836 he settled on the farm, where his son now resides, on section 35, Scotland township. He died here August 30, 1858. He was an earnest christian, and one of the original members of Camp creek Presbyterian church. Theophilus G. Walker was the ninth, of a family of ten children, and was born on the farm which is now his home, May 5, 1843. He was educated in the district school, and at Abingdon college; where he attended for a time. On completing his education he engaged in farming, which occupation he has always followed. He owns 247 acres of well improved land, and is a thorough going and successful farmer. He served as county supervisor in 1882, and has held other offices of trust in the township. He was married, December 11, 1873, to Emma C. Thomson, a daughter of Rev. P. W. Thomson, of this county. They have three children—Wallace A., Bertha and Alta. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are members of Camp creek Presbyterian church.

Rev. Preston W. Thomson, was born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, January 17, 1816, and is a son of James H. Thomson, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. In 1828 his parents moved to Decatur county, Indiana, where Preston W., grew to manhood. In 1844 he entered the theological seminary at New Albany, Indiana, where he took a full course and graduated. He was licensed to preach in 1846, and ordained in 1848. In the summer of that year he assumed charge of a church at Mt. Carmel, Illinois, where he continued five years. He then preached 16 months at Vermont, Illinois, then went to Ipava. In 1857, moved to Prairie City, and was then pastor of a church until 1868. Two years later he became pastor of the Camp creek church, continuing in charge four and one half years. He now resides with his son-in-law, T. G. Walker. He was married December 14, 1848, to Mary A. Ashmore, a native of Indiana. They have one child, Emma C., now the wife of Theophilus G. Walker, as heretofore stated.

John Clark came to McDonough county in the fall of 1835, and located on section 27, Scotland township, where his son Samuel now lives.

James Clark, a prominent farmer of Scotland township, is a son of John Clark, who came to this county and located in Scotland township in the fall of 1835. John Clark was born in Scotland, November 19, 1794. He grew to manhood in his native country and in 1817, emigrated to America, and settled in Washington county, Virginia, where he lived, with the exception of a short time spent in Indiana, until the fall of 1834. He then moved to Morgan county Illinois, and spent one year, coming from thence to this county. He lived on section 27, until 1863. In that year he moved to Macomb, where he died June 21, 1876. John Clark was married in 1817, to Nancy Clark, a native of Scotland. They were the parents of six children, five of whom are now living. Mrs. Clark died April 29, 1861. James Clark, the subject of this sketch, and the eldest son of the family, was born in Washington county Virginia, August 14, 1825. He followed the fortunes of the family, coming with them to this county in 1835, and remaining with them until 1850. He then began improving the farm where he now lives, which is a well improved and highly desirable place, containing 221 acres, located on section 28. He was married April 7, 1853, to Margaret A. Watson, a daughter of David Watson, one of the early settlers of this county. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have had three children born to them—Belle, now Mrs. Patrick; William H. and Janie N. Mr. Clark is a member of the Ebenezer Presbyterian church, an enterprising and prosperous farmer and a good citizen.

John Allison came to Scotland township from Industry, in December, 1835, and located on section 31. He died there in 1859. His son John still resides upon the place. The latter was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, January 31, 1819. He was married December 30, 1847, to Manah J. Provine. They were the parents of nine children—James A., John A., Zachary T., Matilda J., William B., Louisa, deceased; Virgil E., George W. and Annie F.

William L Pace removed to Scotland township from Bethel, in 1835, and located on section 31, where his son Andrew J. now resides.

Andrew J. Pace is a son of William I. Pace, a native of Cumberland county, Kentucky, born in May, 1809. William I. was reared in his native state, and there married to Sarah E. Vawters. In 1833, he removed to Illinois, and located on section 2, Bethel township, where he resided until 1835. In that year he moved to the farm now owned by his son, on section 31, Scotland township. In the fall of 1854, he removed to Macomb, where he died in May, 1855. He had a family of nine children, eight of whom are now living. Andrew J. Pace was born November 5, 1842, on the farm where he was reared, and which has always been his home. He was married February 29, 1872, to Mary J. Walker, a daughter of James Walker. He has an excellent and well improved farm which contains 242 acres. He is a public spirited and useful citizen, and has been an office-holder. He was commissioner of highways four years, and township collector and assessor, in 1883 and 1884. He was in the service during the late war, enlisting August 12, 1862, in company H, of the 2d Illinois cavalry, and serving three years. He is a member of the G. A. R.

OTHER SETTLERS

Besides the pioneers mentioned above, the following citizens are all worthy of due notice in connection with their township history.

Alexander Watson, a prominent citizen of Scotland township, is a native of Scotland, born January 19, 1826, and a son of Hugh Watson, who lived and died in Scotland. Alexander was brought up upon a farm in his native county, where he remained till May, 1851, then with the family, emigrated to America and settled on Camp creek, in McDonough county, Illinois. Two years later, he removed to Farmer's township, Fulton county, lived there three years, after which he located upon his present farm on section 12, Scotland township. Mr. Watson was married September 4, 1849, to Isabella Galbraith, a native of Scotland; they have five children living—Hugh, Dugal A., John W., Anna B., Katie J., and Thomas D., who died December 23, 1881, in the 24th year of his age. Mr. Watson is the owner of a finely improved farm, comprising 268 acres. He is a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church.

John Watson, oldest son of Hugh Watson, (who lived and died in Scotland), was born March 9, 1824, in Campbelltown, Argyleshire, Scotland, where he was raised and educated. At the age of 11 years, he was apprenticed seven years to the shoemakers trade, at Glasgow, Scotland, after which he followed that occupation till 1851. In that year he emigrated with his brothers and sister to America, and located on Camp creek where he worked at his trade two years. In 1854, he removed to a farm in Fulton county and followed farming with his brothers till 1857, then returned to this county and purchased his present home. He now has a valuable and well improved farm containing 186 acres. Mr. Watson has held the office of county supervisor and commissioner of highways of Scotland township. He is a member of Camp creek Presbyterian church. In January 1857, he was united in marriage to Jennet Douglas, of New Salem township. Seven children have blessed their union, four of whom still live—Jennetta, Margaret J., John H., and Sarah A.

Thomas Watson, brother of Alexander, was born January 6, 1836, in Scotland. He came to America in the spring of 1851, and lived with his brothers two years on Camp creek, and three years in Fulton county, after which he removed to his present farm on section 12, Scotland township. He has a finely improved and highly desirable place, containing 225 acres. June 6, 1867, he was married to Margaret Barclay, a daughter of James Barclay, formerly a resident of Scotland township. Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Watson are the parents of six children—Agnes J., Ella E., Mary B., Annie L., Harvey W. and Nettie M. Mr. Watson is, like his brothers, a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church.

Archibald Watson, deceased, was born near Campbelltown, Argyleshire, Scotland, in July, 1830, and came to America with his brothers in 1851. After residing on Camp creek, in Scotland township, for about two years, he with his brothers removed to Fulton county, near Table Grove, and followed farming for three years. He came back to Scotland township in the spring of 1858, when he purchased the east half of the northeast quarter of section 12. Mr. Watson was united in marriage to Agnes Barclay, June 6, 1861. They were the parents of six children—Mary J., Hugh W., James A., Isabel, Albert T. and Mattie L. He was the owner of a valuable farm, consisting of 225 acres, on which he resided at the time of his death which occurred March 11, 1879. He was a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church.

Hugh Watson, member of the present board of county supervisors, and one of the leading citizens of Scotland township, is a son of Alexander Watson, and was born March 26, 1851, in Scotland. He was about two months old when the family emigrated to this country. He has spent the greater part of his life in McDonough county, coming here in 1851, his only absence from it being three years which the family spent in Fulton county. His education was obtained in the public schools of the county, including the Normal at Macomb, which he attended for a time. He made his home upon the farm with his parents till 1882. He purchased his present farm in 1880, and worked upon it two years previous to his removal to it, April 8, 1882. He owns 100 acres of well improved and highly cultivated land, and has a desirable home. He is a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church. He was elected township clerk in 1876, which office he held three years. He was county supervisor during 1879 and 1880; in 1881, was appointed township clerk, to fill a vacancy, and elected to the same office the following year. In 1883, he was again elected county supervisor, and in 1884-85 re-elected to the same office. He is a director of the "Mutual Insurance company," of Industry, Illinois. Mr. Watson was married March 29,1882, to Jennie S. Blazer, daughter of David Blazer, a former resident of this county. They have two children—Alza C. and Florence M. Mrs. Watson was a teacher in this county for eight years, teaching one year of that time in the Macomb public school. Mr. Watson also taught school three terms in district No. 1, Scotland township.

John W. Watson, another son of Alexander Watson, is a native of Fulton county, Illinois, born on March 21, 1855. He removed to this county with the family, in 1857. Here he grew to manhood receiving his education in the district school and at Macomb. He began farming on his present farm in 1880. His residence was erected two years later. He has 100 acres of land, all under cultivation. He was united in marriage December 13, 1882, with Lizzie N. Allison, a daughter of A. H. Allison, of Scotland township. Mr. and Mrs. Watson have one child, named—Edna G. The brothers Watson, both elder and younger, rank prominently among the best class of Scotland township's citizens.

Thomas Watson is a son of Hugh Watson, who lived and died in Scotland. Thomas was born in that country, January 6, 1836, and remained there until April, 1851, when he accompanied his three brothers and a sister, to America. They came directly to McDonough county, and settled on Camp creek, in Scotland township. Two years later they removed to Fulton county where they resided three years, then returned to Scotland township, and Thomas then located on his present farm, which is desirably located on section 12, and contains 200 acres of well improved land. Mr. Watson was married June 6, 1867, to Margaret Barclay, daughter of James Barclay, formerly of this township, but now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Watson are the parents of six children—Agnes J., Ella E., Mary B., Annie L, Harvey W. and Mattie M. Mr. Watson is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and a leading citizen of Scotland township.

John M. Kelly, son of George and Nancy (Marshall) Kelly, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1829. John was reared in his native county, and obtained his education in the common schools. He was engaged in farming there until 1851, when he went to Crawford county, Ohio, and remained three years, then returned to Pennsylvania. One year later, he removed to McDonough county, and located upon section 18, Scotland township, where he now resides. He has a fine farm, comprising 160 acres on section 18, and 160 in Chalmers township. March 11, 1856, he was united in marriage with Agnes Doran, who died January 14, 1873, leaving him three children—Alice Belle, George B. and Johnny Blair. Mr. Kelly was married April 27, 1875, to Belle McAlister, a native of Scotland. By this union there is one child—Annie Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are members of the Christian church at Macomb. He is an enterprising farmer and a worthy citizen.

Abraham Kline is the eldest son of Aaron Kline, who was born in Pennsylvania, about the year 1815. Aaron was reared in that state, and there married to Sarah Hughes, also a native of Pennsylvania. In March, 1857, they emigrated to Illinois, and located in Eldorado township, where they lived until 1867, then removed to section 8, Scotland township, where they now reside. They have had nine children, eight of whom are now living—Abraham, Mary, Jane, John, William, Angie, Joseph and Elizabeth. Abraham, the subject of this sketch, was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1840. He was brought up on a farm, remaining with his parents until 1862. In that year he went to Eldorado township, and there followed farming one year, thence to New Salem, where he followed the same occupation two years, after which he removed to Macomb township, and resided 12 years. He located upon his present farm, on section 7, Scotland township, in the spring of 1882. His place is well improved, and comprises 120 acres. Mr. Kline was married September 1, 1867, to Mary E. Easton, a native of Vermont. They have six children living—Franklin, Wilmer, Leona, Fred, Nellie and Ollie.

John F. Miner, a farmer of Scotland township, is a son of John F. Miner, Sr., an early settler in New Salem township. The subject of this sketch was born January 25, 1849, in Fulton county, Illinois. When he was six years old his parents removed to McDonough county, where he was brought up and educated. He worked upon his father's farm in New Salem township until he attained his majority, then, in 1871, located on section 24, of the same township, where he followed farming until March, 1884. He then moved to his present home on section 30, Scotland township. He owns a good farm comprising 160 acres of valuable land on that section, also 20 acres of timber in Industry. Mr. Miner was married September 29, 1870, to Elizabeth Ritter, a native of Fulton county, who died Nov. 11, 1878, leaving him one child—Dolly B. He was again married December 25, 1880, to Cassie Swango, a native of this county, and a daughter of Barnett Swango, of New Salem township. By this union there is one child—Claudie L. Mr. Miner ranks among the first class of Scotland township's citizens.

John Barclay, a prosperous farmer of Scotland township, is a son of James Barclay, a native of Scotland, who was born in 1805. In April, 1850, James Barclay removed with his family to America, and came directly to this county, locating upon section 26, Scotland township. The subject of this sketch, John Barclay, was born about two miles from Linlithgow, Scotland, July 25, 1833. He came with his parents to this country in 1850, and remained with them, working upon the farm until 1860. In that year he removed to section 3, of the same township, where he still resides. He purchased at first 80 acres, but now has 200 acres, all under cultivation and well improved. Mr. Barclay was married June 6, 1861, to Nancy Kelly, a native of Scotland, and by this union has five children—Margaret E., Nannie C., James L., Charles W. and John A. Mr. Barclay has served as county supervisor two years, as township clerk two years, and as a commissioner of highways seven years. He is a member of Camp creek Presbyterian church.

James Barclay, another son of James Barclay, deceased, was born December 21, 1841, in Scotland, and came to this country with his father's family in 1850. He was brought up on the farm, and educated in the district school. In 1873 he settled on the farm where he now lives. It is located on section 9, Scotland township, and contains 160 acres of highly desirable land. In the spring of 1864, he enlisted in the 100 hundred days service, becoming a member of company I, of the 137th Illinois infantry. He served until the expiration of his time and was discharged at Springfield, Illinois. He was united in marriage, November 26, 1874, to Jane McCallister, a daughter of Ronald McCallister of this township. They have two children—John F. and James R. Mr. Barclay is a member of Camp creek Presbyterian church.

Andrew Barclay is a son of James Barclay, who was born in Scotland August 28, 1806, and came to America, and Scotland township, McDonough county, in June, 1850. Three months later he settled, where Andrew now lives, on section 26. He was married March 16, 1832, to Agnes Binnie, a sister of Andrew Binnie, of this township. She was born in Scotland March 22, 1808, and is still living. James Barclay died while on a visit to Scotland, September 1, 1883. They raised a family of eight children—John, Robert, Agnes, James, Margaret, Andrew, William and Alexander. Andrew Barclay was born in Scotland September 17, 1846, and came here with the family in 1850. He was brought up on the farm where he and his brother Alexander now live. He was married April 4, 1878, to Catherine McAlister, and by this union has four children—Albert R., James I., Anna A. and George C. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the Camp creek Presbyterian church.

Alexander Barclay was born on the farm, where he has always resided, July 25, 1852. He owns, in partnership with his brother Andrew, 210 acres of land, and is in prosperous circumstances.

Robert Barclay is a son of James Barclay, and came to this country with his father's family in 1850. Robert was born in Scotland, June 1, 1835. He obtained his education in his native country, where he was brought up on a farm. After coming to Scotland township, he lived with his parents, and worked upon the farm until the spring of 1864. At that date he located on his present farm which is now one of the best in the township. It comprises 122 acres on section 11. He owns also 80 acres on section 14. He carries on general farming, and buys and feeds considerable stock. He erected his commodious residence in 1873, at a cost of $2,000. His barn, which is large and convenient, was built in 1876, costing $1,775. Mr. Barclay was elected, in 1881, to the office of justice of the peace, which he still holds. He is school director of district No. 1, and a prominent and worthy citizen. He is connected with the Presbyterian church of Camp creek. August 17, 1866, he was married to Jane Donaldson, a native of Scotland. They are the parents of five children—William, Robert, John, Ellen and Jessie.

Granville R. Rexroat is a son of Peter Rexroat, a native of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, born May 2, 1802. When a child of eight years, Peter removed with his parents to Russell county, Kentucky, where he was reared, and married to Morning Hopper, a native of Virginia. She died in October, 1874. He survived until April, 1877. They had a family of six children, of whom Granville is the fifth. In 1846, Peter Rexroat moved, with his family, to Morgan county, Illinois, where they lived 18 months, then removed to Des Moines county, Iowa. They came from thence to Scotland township, in the spring of 1853, locating on section 23, where Peter Rexroat died. Granville was born October 11, 1839, in Kentucky. He resided with his parents until 1866, when he settled on his present farm on section 24, Scotland township, containing 300 acres of choice land. Mr. Rexroat was married September 17, 1865, to Mary A. Daldoch, a native of Kentucky. They are the parents of eight children—Adelia V., Alice M., Hettie B., Anna E., Minnie, Della, James W. and Granville E. Mr. Rexroat was assessor of Scotland township in 1882. He is a member of the United Brethren church.

Lawson T. Rexroat, who resides upon section 24, Scotland township, is a son of James Rexroat, and was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, July 5, 1851. In 1853 the family moved to McDonough county, Illinois, and settled in Scotland township, where Lawson was reared, and obtained his education in the common schools. He worked upon his father's farm from the time he attained a suitable age until 1876, when he located on his present place. He has 160 acres, all under cultivation, and well improved. He was married September 2, 1875, to Alice Rexroat of Morgan county, Illinois. They have three children—Sarah, Lela, Harvey Earl, who died May 18, 1880; and Alta J. In the fall of 1882, Mr. Rexroat removed with his family to Morgan county, Illinois, where they resided two years, then returned to Scotland township. He is a member of the United Brethren church.

James M. Rexroat, importer of Norman, English and Clyde horses, began this business in 1870, under the firm name of Rexroat, Moore & Westfall. In 1873 he bought out his partners' interests, and has since continued the business alone. Since 1873, he has made three trips to Europe after horses, and has imported in all, 24 head. Mr. Rexroat is a native of Russell county, Kentucky, born January 22, 1828. He is a son of Peter Rexroat, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1802. In 1809 his parents removed to Kentucky, thence to this county, in 1853. James M. came here with his father's family, and settled in Scotland township, where he now owns one of the finest farms in the township, which comprises 320 acres of finely improved land. Mr. Rexroat was married September 8, 1850, to Jane Moyers, a native of Greene county, Illinois. They have ten children—Lawson T., Eliza, Winfield, Sarah, William H., Jourdan H., Teleus C., Robert H., Edgar L. and Frederick D. Mr. Rexroat is a man of sterling qualities, and held in high esteem throughout the community. He has held all of the local offices, and always creditably. He is a member of the Masonic lodge and chapter, and one of the trustees of the United Brethren church.

Andrew Binnie, deceased, was a native of Falkirk, Scotland, born March 9, 1805. He was a son of Robert Binnie, also a native of Scotland. Andrew grew to manhood in Scotland, and was there married, to Agnes Waddill, who was born in that country, October 14, 1813. They had a family of seven children, five of whom are now living in this township—Robert and John, twins; Andrew, James, and Annie, wife of John F. Watson. In June, 1849, Mr. Binnie emigrated with his family to America, and settled at Astoria, Fulton county, Illinois. They remained there but three months, then removed to section 27, Scotland township, where Mr. Binnie died, March 2, 1855. His widow, Mrs. Agnes Binnie, survived until July 27, 1879, when she died, in this township.

John Binnie, son of Andrew Binnie, was born in Falkirk, Scotland, March 14, 1842. He was quite young when his parents settled in this county, where he was educated and grew to manhood's estate. He then engaged in farming with his brother Robert, until 1878. In April, of that year, he removed to his present home. He owns a fine farm of 320 acres, and is engaged in raising and feeding stock. He was married March 28, 1880, to Effie B. Savage, daughter of James S. Savage. They have two children—Alena and Eunice D. Mr. Binnie is a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church, and in 1874 held the office of assessor of Scotland township.

James Binnie, son of Andrew Binnie, is located on section 5, Scotland township, where he owns a well improved farm, comprising 200 acres. Mr. Binnie was born July 29, 1845, in Scotland, and came with his father's family to McDonough county in 1849. He remained living with his parents till 1868. He then worked for himself, upon his father's farm until 1881, at which time he settled upon his present farm. He was married March 4, 1874, to Maria L. Moore, a daughter of John C. Moore, of Scotland township. By this union there are three children—Agnes V., Alice M., and Raleigh H. Mr. Binnie is a prominent citizen of this township, and a member of the Presbyterian church. In May 1864, he enlisted in the three months service, in the 137th Illinois infantry, and served till October, 1864.

Robert Binnie, is a son of Andrew Binnie, a native of Scotland. Robert was also born there, March 14, 1842. Early in the forties the family came to America, and settled in Scotland township, McDonough county, Illinois. Here Robert grew to manhood, and received his education. In his youth he assisted his father upon the farm, and in 1863, rented a farm in this township and began business for himself. Four years later he removed to his present location, where he owns 277 acres of well cultivated and desirable land. He owns also, 20 acres of timber land in Industry township. February 25, 1869, he was married to Margaret J. Watson, daughter of James C. Watson, now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Binnie are the parents of three children—Mary A., William A., and James R. They are christian people, and members of the Camp creek church. He is one of the substantial citizens of Scotland township.

John V. Haggerty, a well known stock dealer and farmer of Scotland township, is a son of John T. and Sarah (Vance) Haggerty, early settlers in this county. John V. was born in Blandinsville township, McDonough county, Illinois, October 2, 1840. He was brought up and received his education in this county. In 1861, he engaged in farming and stock dealing on section 22, Blandinsville township, where he made his residence six years. He removed to his present farm in 1867; it consists of 160 acres of good and well improved land. He was united in marriage March 17, 1864, with Abigail L. Brewster, a native of Pennsylvania. By their union there were four children—Augustus A., Emma L., Clarence V., and Ellen. Mrs. Haggerty died July 2, 1872, and October 23, 1813, Mr. Haggerty was married to Tina A. Pearce, who died May 15, 1877, leaving two children, both of whom are now deceased. William L., was born August 28, 1874, and died August 14, 1879. Alta M., was born April 9, 1877, and died June 7, of the same year.

Robertson B. Knowles, the present popular and gentlemanly superintendent of the county poor farm, is a native of McDonough county, born December 18, 1839. He is a son of William Knowles, who came to McDonough county from Washington, D. C., in 1838. William Knowles was born in that city and had spent all his life there, previous to coming here. He was married to Lucinda Robinson, and by this union had eight children, of whom Robertson B., was the fifth. He died in Macomb, on the 11th of February, 1877. His wife died September 27, 1875. Robertson B. Knowles was reared and educated in this county, and has here followed farming and merchandising until March, 1883, when he assumed his present position. He is well fitted for his duties, being of a genial and kindly nature, and possessed of an unlimited amount of patience. He has entire charge of the house, farm and inmates. He was married September 19, 1865, to Sarah Nunn, a native of Kentucky. They are the parents of six children—Emma E., Mary A., William L., Rebecca L., Dora M., and Gilbert R. In the month of August, 1862, Mr. Knowles enlisted in company H, of the 2d Illinois cavalry, and served in said regiment till the close of the war. He was discharged June 10, 1865. He is now a member of the G. A. R.

Abner Jones, is a son of John Jones, who was born June 1, 1798, in Pennsylvania. John Jones, when a young man, went to Hocking county, Ohio, where he lived till 1851. In that year, he removed to McDonough county, Illinois, and settled in Chalmers township. In 1856, he came to Scotland township, and settled on section 18. He was married to Rebecca A. DeMoss, a native of Virginia. They had a family of nine children—William T., Darius, Lewis, Abner, Russell, Samuel, David, Rebecca J., and John. John Jones, died December 16, 1865. His widow, Rebecca, survived until August 12, 1881. Abner Jones was born, March 15, 1833, in Hocking county, Ohio. He removed with his parents, to this county, in 1851, remaining with them until 1857. He then went to Linn county, Kansas, where he lived three years, after which he returned to this county. He settled where he now lives, in 1871. He has a desirable farm, containing 80 acres of well improved land. Mr. Jones was married, March 23, 1871, to Mary Blair, a native of Ohio. They are the parents of two children—Walter B., and Harry A. Mr. Jones is an enterprising farmer, and a worthy citizen.

Elijah Herndon, is a native of Cass county, Illinois, born November 28, 1850. He is a son of Manson Herndon, who came to this county with his family in 1856. Elija was reared and educated in this township, remaining with his parents until 1871. At that date he located on the farm where he now resides, but did not purchase the place until 1882. He has 160 acres of well improved land. Mr. Herndon was married March 20, 1873, to Lucinda Clarke, a native of Morgan county, Illinois. They have four children—Wilber A., Howard, Edith and Ivy. He is one of the well-to-do, prosperous farmers of Scotland township, and enjoys the respect and confidence of all those who are happy enough to be well acquainted with him and his character. Such sterling men as he is are a blessing to the community in which he lives, and raises the population in the estimation of all observant people. Mr. Herndon's place, in its neatness and thrift, manifests his knowledge of his business of farming.

William B. Atherton, located on his present farm on section 36, Scotland township, in October 1872. He has a farm of 125 acres, well improved, and is a successful farmer. He was born in Hancock county, Illinois, March 14, 1842, and is a son of Joseph Atherton, who came from Ohio. In 1845, the family removed to Stark county, Illinois, where William was reared and educated. He followed farming there until he came to this county. In February, 1864, he enlisted in company C, of the 14th Illinois infantry and served until June 1865, in Sheridan's army. He was united in marriage March 3, 1869, with Amelia Atherton, and by this union has two children—Nellie and Emma.

William F. Jones is a native of Macomb, McDonough county, Illinois, born March 26, 1841. His father, Samuel R. Jones, came to this county from Ohio, in 1837, and four years later, became a resident of Scotland township, where he resided until 1883. He then removed to Nebraska, where he now lives. William F. has spent his entire life, with the exception of three years in the army, in Scotland township, obtaining his education in the district schools. He enlisted August 7, 1862, in company C, of the 84th Illinois infantry, and served till June, 1865. He was under command of General Thomas at the battles of Stone river Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Nashville and Franklin, and with Sherman on his march to Atlanta. At the time of his discharge he held the rank of second lieutenant. When he returned home from the army he engaged in farming on the place where he now lives. His farm is a desirable one and contains 80 acres of well improved land. He was married October 23, 1866, to Jennie Hammer, a daughter of J. E. D. Hammer, of Pennington’s Point. They have three children—James E., Lulu G. and Beulah B.

Jerome B. Jones is a son of Samuel R. Jones, and was born September 10, 1845, in Scotland township, where he was reared and educated. In 1867, he engaged in farming on the southwest quarter of section 26, where he remained until September, 1883. He then removed to his present farm which contains 170 acres, and is located on the same section. He was married November 16, 1871, to Mary J. Standard, a native of McDonough county. They have five children—Annie B., Joab, Mabel, Jennie and Martha.

Perry C. Jones was born on section 36, Scotland township, June 12, 1842, and is a son of Samuel R. Jones. Perry C. was educated and grew to manhood in his native township. In early life he followed farming. May 24, 1861, he enlisted in company B, of the 16th Illinois infantry, and served until the end of his term. He was in the army of the Cumberland, and at the battle of Buzzard's Roost, February 25, 1863, and was wounded in the leg and sent to the hospital at Chattanooga, thence to Nashville, thence to Jeffersonville, Indiana. From the latter place he was sent to Springfield, where he was discharged. He then returned home and resumed farming on the homestead farm, which was his birthplace, and is still his home. He owns 80 acres of land and has a desirable farm. He was united in marriage December 28, 1865, with Julia A. Cox, a daughter of Thomas Cox. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are the parents of seven children—Iverson E., Samuel L., Minnie M., Nina B., Bessie F., Jessie A. and Alta M.

William McMillan, a worthy farmer of Scotland township, is a native of Ireland, where he was born February 18, 1829. He left Ireland when quite young, and came to America, locating in the state of Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood's estate and remained until 1852. In that year he came west and settled in McDonough county. He engaged in farming the land of John D. Walker, near Macomb, remaining on the same place until 1863, when he removed to his present farm. He was married in October, 1851, to Elizabeth Storks. Two children have blessed their union—Mary J. and David H. Mr. McMillan has held the office of commissioner of highways for seven years.

Cyrus Walker, is a son of Cyrus Walker, Sr., the noted lawyer, and was born in Adair county, Kentucky, September 25, 1832. The following year the family moved to McDonough county, Illinois, and located in Scotland township, where the subject of this sketch now resides. He grew to manhood here, and has spent the greater portion of his life upon the homestead farm, of which he took charge, after the death of his father. He owns 180 acres of well improved land, located on section 34. Mr. Walker was married September 11, 1860, to Mary J. McGaghey. They have eight children—John C., Flora H., Cynthia A., Arthur, Guy, Grier, Pitt M., and Nancy. Mr. Walker is a member of the Camp creek Presbyterian church, an upright, honest man and an esteemed citizen. He has, all his life, been identified with the interests of this township, and is well known throughout the county, as an early settler, and a member of the honored family of Walker.

EDUCATIONAL

According to the last annual report of the county superintendent, for the school year ending June 30, 1884, it is learned that Scotland township has 287 children of school age, 259 of whom are enrolled in the nine different schools of the township, the average number of months of school per annum being seven and four-ninths. There were two new school houses erected in the township during the year, making a total at present of nine, all of which are frame. The highest monthly wages paid any male teacher is $45, and the lowest $35, while the highest wages paid female teachers is $35 and the lowest $22 per mouth. Scotland is free from any bonded indebtedness, except about $75, with an estimated value of school property of $6,650 and a tax levy for the support of her educational institutions of $2,750.

Crown Point, District No. 1.—This district was organized April 21, 1856, at a meeting held at the residence of John Upp. A small frame house was erected the same year. The district increased in wealth and population so rapidly that they were compelled to erect a new building, which they did in 1874, on the site of the old one, and at a cost of $1,469. It is located on section 1. The first directors were Green Lane, S. S. Chapman and F. Laughlin. The first to wield the birch, was Levi W. Elliott. The present teacher is Jennie Bethel.

Maple Grove, District No. 2.—The building situated on section 4. The district organized in April, 1856. During the first year, school was held in a log dwelling, on a knoll about a mile west of the present building, called Mount Nebo. In 1857, a good frame building was erected, which, on the 1st of March, 1868, was burned. In the same year, the present house was erected at a cost of $1,500, and is 24x32 feet in size. The first directors of the district were J. H. Swigart, T. M. Fox and Edmund Palk. T. McMahan was the first teacher. Those serving the district as directors at present are, John Barclay, Philip Hesh and Chas. Taylor. Laura Gesler is the teacher at present.

District No. 3.—The school building in this district, is located on the southeast corner of section 6. Is a good frame structure, valued at $600.

District No. 4.—The school house stands on the northwest corner of section 20. It was erected several years since, and in 1883, a new house was built, and at present, is valued at about $900.

District No. 5.—This district has a good frame school house, and is known as "Center school." The building is on the southeast corner of section 16.

Union, District No. 6.—The district organized and building erected in 1857. The house located on section 13, and was built at a cost of $700. In 1882, the district erected a new building on the site of the old house, which was purchased by James Rexroat for a tenement house, and is situated about one mile north. The new building was completed at a cost of about $1,000.

District No. 7.—The school building is located on the southeast corner of section 26, and is valued at $500.

District No. 8.—The school house stands on the northeast corner of section 33. It was built several years ago, and was repaired and remodeled in 1883. It is valued at present, at about $800.

District No. 9.—The building is situated on the southwest corner of section 29. The district was organized in April, 1847. A building 18x28 feet was then erected, one-half mile south of the present one. In 1863 they moved into their new building.

RELIGIOUS

The first sermon in the township was preached by Rev. William K. Stewart, of Macomb, in December, 1837, at the residence of Cyrus Walker.

The United Brethren have a church building on section 13. The society was organized in 1860. (See Ecclesiastical chapter.)

ORGANIZATION

At the time of the division of the county, in 1857, Scotland township was constituted. The first township election was held on the 7th day of April, of that year, and J. H. Swigart and John Clark were elected justices of the peace; F. F. Hatch and Hugh H. McKee, constables. Isaac P. Montfort was chosen to represent the township on the board of supervisors.

The present township officers are as follows: Supervisor, Hugh Watson; clerk, Andrew Binnie; assessor, J. E. Cooper; collector, W. G. Riggins; highway commissioners, Robert Barclay, James Allison and Duncan McMillan; justices of the peace, J. G. McGaughey and Andrew Binnie; constables, Robert Merrill and T. G. Walker.

The first election was held at the house of Samuel Mitchell, on the farm now owned by W. W. Henderson.

FIRST ITEM

The first death was that of the Rev. Ezekiel Campbell, who died on the southwest quarter of section 34, in 1834.


Source: The History of McDonough County, together with sketches of the towns, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent individuals, and biographies of the representative citizens, 1885, pages 711-726. Transcribed by Karl A. Petersen